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Pickrell Lab

Joe Pickrell’s computational genomics lab develops novel statistical approaches to transform large-scale genomic data into improved understanding of human biology and evolution. Much of the Pickrell Lab’s work is focused on understanding natural human variation. What are the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms that lead to differences in phenotypes and disease risk between individuals? The Pickrell Lab is recruiting. To view open positions, please visit our Careers page.

 

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    Joe Pickrell

    People-SciFaculty-Pickrell

    Joe Pickrell is a Junior Investigator and Core Member at the New York Genome Center, and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University. He runs a lab dedicated to developing computational and statistical tools to transform large-scale genomic data into a better understanding of human biology.

    Before joining the New York Genome Center in 2014, Joe was a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard Medical School. He holds a PhD in Human Genetics from the University of Chicago and a BS in Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    jkpickrell@nygenome.org | @joe_pickrell

  • SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

    • Liu JZ, Erlich Y, Pickrell JK

      Case-control association mapping by proxy using family history of disease.

      Nat Genet. 2017 Jan 16. PMID: 28092683

    • Pickrell, J.K., Marioni, J.C., Pai, A.A., Degner, J.F., Engelhardt, B.E., Nkadori, E., Veyrieras, J.-B., Stephens, M., Gilad, Y., Pritchard, J.K.

      Understanding mechanisms underlying human gene expression variation with RNA sequencing.

      Nature 464, 768—772. (2010).

    • Pickrell, J.K., Pai, A.A., Gilad, Y., Pritchard, J.K.

      Noisy splicing drives mRNA isoform diversity in human cells.

      PLoS Genetics 6, e1001236 (2010).

    • Pickrell et al.

      Ancient west Eurasian ancestry in southern and eastern Africa.

      2014.

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This work was partially supported by a gift from the Simons Foundation.